Chapter 6: Prairie Points with a Purpose


Fabric:  100% cotton print – pale blue with blue stripe

Stabilizer: none – just fabric folded in half

Foot: B (regular zigzag)

Stitch length: varies with pattern chosen

Stitch width: varies with pattern

Threads:  sewing threads

 

 

 

 

 

I chose a complementary colour scheme of blue and orange.  I used cotton threads in different values of blue and orange.  Sometimes the bobbin matched and sometimes not.

 

 

 

 

 

For the first sample, I covered the raw edges by placing the prairie points behind the base strip and behind each other.  The sample seems to curve slightly, probably because of the weight of the folded pieces.

For the second sample I placed the prairie points on top of the base strip so that the raw edges remain visible.Image

For the third sample, I stitched another strip to use the base strip and to include it in the structure.  On one row of the stitch patterns, I used a pearl cotton to do a cable stitch.  The pattern is obliterated on the pearl cotton side, but has a wonderful texture and sheen.   I have some points with the raw edges showing and others not.  I sewed the second row together first and then attached that to the very top edge of the base strip with a patterned stitch.  Then I attached the front three triangles below that on the base strip. I covered the raw edges of these three triangles with a stitch pattern.  This was an easier method of keeping the strip straighter.Image

I have used regular folded fabric prairie points along the edges of a baby quilt and several small wall hangings.  It does add considerable weight to a project and bulk to the edge of a quilt.  When using folded fabric (not machine decorated) prairie points, I like to interlock the prairie points with each other.

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Resolved sample – “Triangle Dangle”

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I decided that I wanted to do this design to fit a triangle shape to echo the prairie point shape.   The design idea came while I was browsing through a book called “Exploring Dimensional Quilt Art” by C. June Barnes.  On pages 86-88, she shows how to make containers from triangles.   This year (2013) is the 40th anniversary of the Embroiderers’ Association of Canada and I wanted to make an evening bag to complement the royal blue dress I was wearing to the banquet at our annual Seminar, and so I thought this would be the perfect solution to two problems.  I chose the colour scheme of red – for the ruby anniversary of the association – and royal blue – the EAC colour.  I added gold accents as this was to be a “party” bag.

I drew out patterns for a 3-sided triangle bag, but felt that the opening would end up too narrow for the base size I wanted (four inches).  Next I drew hexagon bag, but the sides would be too narrow to fit very many prairie points in a design. After looking up the angles for a pentagon, I settled on a pentagon design with a base pentagon of 4 inches along each side.  I made paper prairie points in four different sizes and played with design placement on the triangle.

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As this was to be an evening bag, I decide to use shiny or “glamorous” fabrics.  I chose dupionni silk for the actual bag sides and made the fabric for the prairie points using satin and chiffon ribbons and sheer nylon chiffon.   For the wider points I used three ribbons in varying widths and for the very narrow points, I used a strip of torn nylon chiffon folded in half with a red lame ribbon inside.  The chiffon has a very interesting texture as the edges frayed nicely where they were torn.  The ribbon layers had finished edges, so did not fray much.

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The outer edge of the triangle dangle is finished with a narrow, commercial cord that has been overstitched with a zigzag in metallic thread before zigzagging the cord onto the edge.

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ribbons and fabric used

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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background and lining fabric and stabilizers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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samples of stitched strips and cord

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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threads used

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the end, I have not constructed the bag, but made one side into a “triangle dangle”. And have a ton of stitched ribbon ready to make a bag!  This is my sampling for a future bag!!

 

Fabric:  base – silk dupionni

                Prairie points – stitched on layers of sheer chiffon and ribbons

Stabilizer: none – just fabric folded in half or layered the ribbons

Foot: B (regular zigzag)

Stitch length: varies with pattern chosen

Stitch width: varies with pattern

Stitch patterns: variety

Threads:  Superior brand gold, red and blue metallic and red cotton

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triangle dangle

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One response to “Chapter 6: Prairie Points with a Purpose

  1. Barbara Haile

    The nicest prairie points I’ve ever seen

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